Developing low-achieving medical students’ self-regulated learning using a combined learning diary and explicit training intervention

Zahra Hajiabadi, Roghayeh Gandomkar*, Amir Sohrabpour, JOHN SANDARS

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The development of self-regulated learning (SRL) is an essential educational component of remediation for low-achieving students. The aim of this study was to design, implement and evaluate a longitudinal SRL intervention combining both a structured learning diary and explicit SRL training in a cohort of low-achieving undergraduate medical students.
Materials and Methods: A mixed methods quasi-experimental study was conducted, with a pretest-posttest study in the intervention group and comparison of the GPA and course grade of the intervention group with a historical comparison group. A questionnaire and focus group explored the participants’ perceptions about the intervention.
Results: The SRL scores (total and rehearsal, organization, critical thinking, metacognitive regulation, time management and environment management) and course grade of participants were significantly improved in the intervention group. The course grade of participants was significantly higher than the comparison group but the GPA was not significantly different. Overall, the participants were positive about the intervention.
Conclusions: This study was the first in medical education to evaluate the effectiveness and user acceptability of an SRL intervention that combined a structured learning diary and explicit SRL training in low-achieving medical students. Further research is recommended in different contexts and with larger number of students.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMedical Teacher
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 24 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Diary
  • Self-regulated learning
  • Low-achieving medical students
  • Intervention

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