Criminal Records: The relationship between music, criminalisation and harm

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding (ISBN)

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Abstract

Music (and sound in general) may not seem to be an obvious choice for criminological consideration, but there are promising areas of analysis in the relationship between sound, music, rights and harm . There are connections between music and crime beyond the obviously criminogenic ones of copyright and peerto-peer file sharing, for example, towards wider harms that can be scrutinized in the interplay of the state, state agents and corporations
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNot Known
Volume17
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 11 Dec 2017
EventForging Social Justice: Local Challenges, Global Complexities - Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 Jul 20177 Jul 2017

Conference

ConferenceForging Social Justice: Local Challenges, Global Complexities
CountryUnited Kingdom
CitySheffield
Period4/07/177/07/17

Fingerprint

Criminalization
Harm
Music
Sound
Crime
File Sharing
Peers

Keywords

  • Music
  • torture
  • censorship
  • harm
  • rights

Cite this

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title = "Criminal Records: The relationship between music, criminalisation and harm",
abstract = "Music (and sound in general) may not seem to be an obvious choice for criminological consideration, but there are promising areas of analysis in the relationship between sound, music, rights and harm . There are connections between music and crime beyond the obviously criminogenic ones of copyright and peerto-peer file sharing, for example, towards wider harms that can be scrutinized in the interplay of the state, state agents and corporations",
keywords = "Music, torture, censorship, harm, rights",
author = "Eleanor Peters",
note = "Papers from the British Criminology 2017 Vol 17",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
booktitle = "Not Known",

}

Peters, E 2017, Criminal Records: The relationship between music, criminalisation and harm. in Not Known. vol. 17, Forging Social Justice: Local Challenges, Global Complexities, Sheffield, United Kingdom, 4/07/17.

Criminal Records: The relationship between music, criminalisation and harm. / Peters, Eleanor.

Not Known. Vol. 17 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding (ISBN)

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AB - Music (and sound in general) may not seem to be an obvious choice for criminological consideration, but there are promising areas of analysis in the relationship between sound, music, rights and harm . There are connections between music and crime beyond the obviously criminogenic ones of copyright and peerto-peer file sharing, for example, towards wider harms that can be scrutinized in the interplay of the state, state agents and corporations

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M3 - Conference proceeding (ISBN)

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