Community and Identity in Cyberspace: A Critical Introduction

P. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper argues that any comprehensive analysis of the meanings of community and identity at the start of the 21st century must include a consideration of the development, current significance, potential and associated risks of what have been called "computer mediated communication" (CMC), "cybercommunities" and "cyberindentities". The paper comprises an attempt to locate the study of such phenomena within the tradition of the sociological study of community, followed by a brief consideration of contested accounts of their potential and risk. Consideration is then given to the related issue of self and identity within virtual community and debates surrounding the potential for positive liberation or negative licence, deviance and criminality. The paper closes with some initial conclusions on the state and potential of the sociological study of this social phenomenon.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-125
JournalHuman Affairs
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2004

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virtual reality
virtual community
computer-mediated communication
Criminality
deviant behavior
liberation
license
community
Cyberspace

Cite this

Martin, P. / Community and Identity in Cyberspace: A Critical Introduction. In: Human Affairs. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 116-125.
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Martin, P 2004, 'Community and Identity in Cyberspace: A Critical Introduction', Human Affairs, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 116-125.

Community and Identity in Cyberspace: A Critical Introduction. / Martin, P.

In: Human Affairs, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.12.2004, p. 116-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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