Co-production in integrated health and social care programmes: a pragmatic model

Axel Kaehne, Andrea Beacham, Julie Feather

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to outline the current thinking on co-production in health and social care, examine the challenges in implementing genuine co-production and argue for a pragmatic version of co-production that may assist programme managers in deciding which type of co-production is most suitable for which programme. Design/methodology/approach A discussion paper based on the professional and academic knowledge and insights of the authors. A focus group interview schedule was used to guide discussions between authors. Findings The authors argue for a pragmatic approach to co-production within integrated care programmes. The authors set out the basic parameters of such an approach containing procedural rather than substantive standards for co-production activities leaving sufficient room for specific manifestations of the practice in particular contexts. Practical implications The authors put forward a pragmatic model of co-production that defines the essential elements of a process for ensuring services are designed to meet with the needs of patients yet allowing the process itself to be adapted to different circumstances. Originality/value The paper summarises the discussion on co-production in relation to integration programmes. It formulates a pragmatic model of co-production that may assist programme managers in establishing good practice co-production frameworks when designing or implementing integrated health and social care services.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Integrated Care
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 21 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Integration
  • Co-production
  • Patient involvement
  • Integrated health and social care
  • Public engagement
  • Programme design

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