Children’s student nurses’ knowledge of spirituality and its implications for educational practice

G. Kenny, M. Ashley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children’s nurse educators have to rely predominantly on adult-based literature to guide their educational practice concerning spirituality in the nursing curriculum. The aim of this study was to get a children’s nursing perspective. A questionnaire was designed around the main themes emerging from the adult literature on spirituality. This was distributed to children’s nurses on the undergraduate curriculum at a UK university. The results showed that some of the challenges of delivering spirituality are common to both adult and children’s nursing. However, there were also significant differences revolving around the impact that children and families had in informing students’ understanding of spirituality, and the problems of seeking a unified theory of spirituality in a children’s nursing context. It concludes that children’s nursing has important lessons to learn from the adult literature; however, it must strive to construct its own insights and use this understanding to inform educational approaches to the topic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-185
JournalJournal of Child Health Care
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Spirituality
Nursing
Nurses
Students
Curriculum

Keywords

  • children’s nursing
  • education
  • spirituality
  • student’s knowledge

Cite this

@article{6bc0a595cbb2486abd856fce057f9c93,
title = "Children’s student nurses’ knowledge of spirituality and its implications for educational practice",
abstract = "Children’s nurse educators have to rely predominantly on adult-based literature to guide their educational practice concerning spirituality in the nursing curriculum. The aim of this study was to get a children’s nursing perspective. A questionnaire was designed around the main themes emerging from the adult literature on spirituality. This was distributed to children’s nurses on the undergraduate curriculum at a UK university. The results showed that some of the challenges of delivering spirituality are common to both adult and children’s nursing. However, there were also significant differences revolving around the impact that children and families had in informing students’ understanding of spirituality, and the problems of seeking a unified theory of spirituality in a children’s nursing context. It concludes that children’s nursing has important lessons to learn from the adult literature; however, it must strive to construct its own insights and use this understanding to inform educational approaches to the topic.",
keywords = "children’s nursing, education, spirituality, student’s knowledge",
author = "G. Kenny and M. Ashley",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1177/1367493505054415",
language = "English",
pages = "174--185",
journal = "Journal of Child Health Care",
issn = "1367-4935",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

Children’s student nurses’ knowledge of spirituality and its implications for educational practice. / Kenny, G.; Ashley, M.

In: Journal of Child Health Care, 2005, p. 174-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children’s student nurses’ knowledge of spirituality and its implications for educational practice

AU - Kenny, G.

AU - Ashley, M.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Children’s nurse educators have to rely predominantly on adult-based literature to guide their educational practice concerning spirituality in the nursing curriculum. The aim of this study was to get a children’s nursing perspective. A questionnaire was designed around the main themes emerging from the adult literature on spirituality. This was distributed to children’s nurses on the undergraduate curriculum at a UK university. The results showed that some of the challenges of delivering spirituality are common to both adult and children’s nursing. However, there were also significant differences revolving around the impact that children and families had in informing students’ understanding of spirituality, and the problems of seeking a unified theory of spirituality in a children’s nursing context. It concludes that children’s nursing has important lessons to learn from the adult literature; however, it must strive to construct its own insights and use this understanding to inform educational approaches to the topic.

AB - Children’s nurse educators have to rely predominantly on adult-based literature to guide their educational practice concerning spirituality in the nursing curriculum. The aim of this study was to get a children’s nursing perspective. A questionnaire was designed around the main themes emerging from the adult literature on spirituality. This was distributed to children’s nurses on the undergraduate curriculum at a UK university. The results showed that some of the challenges of delivering spirituality are common to both adult and children’s nursing. However, there were also significant differences revolving around the impact that children and families had in informing students’ understanding of spirituality, and the problems of seeking a unified theory of spirituality in a children’s nursing context. It concludes that children’s nursing has important lessons to learn from the adult literature; however, it must strive to construct its own insights and use this understanding to inform educational approaches to the topic.

KW - children’s nursing

KW - education

KW - spirituality

KW - student’s knowledge

U2 - 10.1177/1367493505054415

DO - 10.1177/1367493505054415

M3 - Article

SP - 174

EP - 185

JO - Journal of Child Health Care

JF - Journal of Child Health Care

SN - 1367-4935

ER -