Can they stomach it? Parent and practitioner acceptability of a trial comparing gastric residual volume measurement versus no gastric residual volume in UK NNU and PICUs: a feasibility study

Elizabeth Deja*, Louise Roper, Lyvonne N. Tume, Jon Dorling, Chris Gale, Barbara Arch, Lynne Latten, Nazima Pathan, Helen Eccleson, Helen Hickey, Jenny Preston, Anne Beissel, Izabela Andrzejewska, Frédéric V. Valla, Kerry Woolfall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

Abstract

Background: Routine measurement of gastric residual volume (GRV) to guide feeding in neonatal and paediatric intensive care is widespread. However, this practice is not evidence based and may cause harm. As part of a feasibility study, we explored parent and practitioner views on the acceptability of a trial comparing GRV measurement or no GRV measurement. Methods: A mixed-methods study involving interviews and focus groups with practitioners and interviews with parents with experience of tube feeding in neonatal and/or paediatric intensive care. A voting system recorded closed question responses during practitioner data collection, enabling the collection of quantitative and qualitative data. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. Results: We interviewed 31 parents and nine practitioners and ran five practitioner focus groups (n=42). Participants described how the research question was logical, and the intervention would not be invasive and potential benefits of not withholding the child’s feeds. However, both groups held concerns about the potential risk of not measuring GRV, including delayed diagnosis of infection and gut problems, increased risk of vomiting into lungs and causing discomfort or pain. Parent’s views on GRV measurement and consent decision making were influenced by their views on the importance of feeding in the ICU, their child’s prognosis and associated comorbidities or complications. Conclusions: The majority of parents and practitioners viewed the proposed trial as acceptable. Potential concerns and preferences were identified that will need careful consideration to inform the development of the proposed trial protocol and staff training.

Original languageEnglish
Article number49
JournalPilot and Feasibility Studies
Volume7
Issue number1
Early online date16 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Feasibility
  • Gastric residual volume
  • Intensive care

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