Breaking Grice's Maxims: Enabling students to recognize and write subtext

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Abstract

In his influential Logic and Conversation (1975) Linguist H.P. Grice suggests that conversation is based on a shared principle of co-operation. Intrinsic to this principle are four maxims that underlie all human discourse. Borrowing from the study of semantics and Grice’s theory of Implicature, playwright Billy Cowan demonstrates how being conscious of these maxims, and then breaking, or even sticking to them religiously, can help students to better understand and write subtext.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNot Known
Pages18-23
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Mar 2018
EventNational Association of Writers in Education Annual Conference - York, United Kingdom
Duration: 9 Nov 201711 Nov 2017

Conference

ConferenceNational Association of Writers in Education Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityYork
Period9/11/1711/11/17

Keywords

  • Creative writing
  • implicature
  • Grice's maxims
  • subtext
  • teaching

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