Becoming More ‘Civilised’: Rock Fans’ Experiences of the Ageing Body

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Rock music has been a key feature of popular culture for over fifty years. Moreover, despite rock’s endurance, it has frequently been portrayed as youth music and as symptomatic of teenage angst (e.g. Frith 1983; Bradley 1992; Keightley 2001). This chapter moves beyond such representations by exploring some of the ways in which ageing, with particular reference to embodiment and corporeality, shapes and impacts on older fans’ participation in rock music scenes. The discussion offers evidence of how a sample of self-defined rock fans negotiates certain physical constraints and adapts behaviour as they grow older.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAgeing and Youth Cultures: Music, Style and Identity
EditorsPaul Hodkinson, Andy Bennett
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherBerg
Pages79-91
ISBN (Print)9781847888358
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Rock music
  • ageing
  • body

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  • Cite this

    Gibson, L. (2012). Becoming More ‘Civilised’: Rock Fans’ Experiences of the Ageing Body. In P. Hodkinson, & A. Bennett (Eds.), Ageing and Youth Cultures: Music, Style and Identity (pp. 79-91). Berg. http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ageing-and-youth-cultures-9781847888358/