‘Beauties and Beasts: Alderson, Wollstonecraft, Godwin, Opie’

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this essay, the ‘Cornish Wonder’ John Opie appears as the Beast to his wife Amelia’s Beauty. Their relationship is reflected upon, together with that of their friends Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, in Amelia Opie’s ambiguously conservative novel Adeline Mowbray. In this text, Opie dissects the personal and social costs of marriage at the dawn of the modern era.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-50
JournalJournal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Wives
Costs
Beast
Beauties
William Godwin
Marriage
Wollstonecraft
Modern Era

Cite this

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title = "‘Beauties and Beasts: Alderson, Wollstonecraft, Godwin, Opie’",
abstract = "In this essay, the ‘Cornish Wonder’ John Opie appears as the Beast to his wife Amelia’s Beauty. Their relationship is reflected upon, together with that of their friends Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, in Amelia Opie’s ambiguously conservative novel Adeline Mowbray. In this text, Opie dissects the personal and social costs of marriage at the dawn of the modern era.",
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journal = "Journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall",
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