Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study

Anne L Foley, Shankar Loharuka, James A Barrett, Ruth Mathews, Kate Williams, Catherine W McGrother, Brenda Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: to determine whether urinary incontinence per se and different types of urinary incontinence individually are associated with an increased risk of falls in those aged 70 years and over. To investigate whether the presence of urinary symptoms, poor quality of life and physical limitations in this population with urinary incontinence is associated with falls. Design: study using data from the cross-sectional postal questionnaire undertaken in the Leicestershire Medical Research Council Incontinence Study. Setting: Leicestershire. Participants: a total of 5,474 people aged 70 years or more living in the community randomly selected from general practitioners’ lists. Results: urinary incontinence and both urge and stress incontinence were positively related to falls (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). The larger the volume of urine lost, the greater the risk of falls (P < 0.0001). Falls were associated with the presence of urinary symptoms (P = 0.01 or less), physical limitations (P = 0.001 or less) and having a poorer quality of life (P = 0.004 or less) in respondents with urinary incontinence. Conclusions: an association has been shown between falling and urinary leakage including the previously unreported association with stress leakage. Falling and urinary incontinence were found to be associated with physical limitations and had an impact on quality of life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-40
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2012

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Urinary Incontinence
Geriatrics
Accidental Falls
Quality of Life
Urge Urinary Incontinence
Stress Urinary Incontinence
General Practitioners
Urine
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Foley, Anne L ; Loharuka, Shankar ; Barrett, James A ; Mathews, Ruth ; Williams, Kate ; McGrother, Catherine W ; Roe, Brenda. / Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study. In: Age and Ageing. 2012 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 35-40.
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title = "Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study",
abstract = "Objective: to determine whether urinary incontinence per se and different types of urinary incontinence individually are associated with an increased risk of falls in those aged 70 years and over. To investigate whether the presence of urinary symptoms, poor quality of life and physical limitations in this population with urinary incontinence is associated with falls. Design: study using data from the cross-sectional postal questionnaire undertaken in the Leicestershire Medical Research Council Incontinence Study. Setting: Leicestershire. Participants: a total of 5,474 people aged 70 years or more living in the community randomly selected from general practitioners’ lists. Results: urinary incontinence and both urge and stress incontinence were positively related to falls (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). The larger the volume of urine lost, the greater the risk of falls (P < 0.0001). Falls were associated with the presence of urinary symptoms (P = 0.01 or less), physical limitations (P = 0.001 or less) and having a poorer quality of life (P = 0.004 or less) in respondents with urinary incontinence. Conclusions: an association has been shown between falling and urinary leakage including the previously unreported association with stress leakage. Falling and urinary incontinence were found to be associated with physical limitations and had an impact on quality of life.",
author = "Foley, {Anne L} and Shankar Loharuka and Barrett, {James A} and Ruth Mathews and Kate Williams and McGrother, {Catherine W} and Brenda Roe",
note = "1. De Vicenzo D, Watkins S. Accidental falls in rehabilitations settings. Rehabil Nurs 1987; 12: 248–52. 2. Baker S, Harvey A. Fall injuries in the elderly. Clin Geriatr Med 1985; 1: 501–12. 3. Liddle J, Gilleard C. The emotional consequences of falls for patients and their families. Age Ageing 1994; 23 (Supp 4): 17. 4. Thom DH, Haan MN, Vandeneeden SK. Medically recognized urinary incontinence and risks of hospitalization, nursing home admission and mortality. Age Ageing 1997; 26: 367–74. 5. Donald IP, Bulpitt CJ. The prognosis of falls in elderly people living at home. Age Ageing 1999; 28: 121–5. 6. Sattin RW, Lambert Huber DA, DeVito CA. The incidence of fall injury events among the elderly in a defined population. Am J Epidemiol 1990; 131: 1028–37. 7. Vetter N, Ford D. Anxiety and depression scores in elderly fallers. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 1989; 4: 158–63. 8. McGrother CW, Donaldson MMK, Shaw C et al. Storage symptoms of the bladder: prevalence, incidence and need for services in the UK. BJU Int 2004; 93: 763–9. 9. Stefania M, Nadia M, Jean L, Mara P, Giuliano E, Gaetano C. Prevalence rate of urinary incontinence in community-dwelling elderly individuals. J Gerontol A: Biol Sci Med Sci 2001; 56: M14–8. 10. Hunskaar S, Ostbye T, Borrie MJ. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in elderly Canadians and its association with dementia, ambulatory function and institutionalization. Norwegian J Epidemiol 1998; 8: 177–82. 11. O’Loughlin JL, Robitaille Y, Boivin J-F, Suissa S. Incidence and risk factors for falls and injurious falls among the community- dwelling elderly. Am J Epidemiol 1993; 137: 342–54. 12. Bergland A, Wyller TB. Risk factors for serious fall related injury in elderly women living at home. Inj Prev 2004; 10: 308–13. 13. Tinetti M, Speechley M, Ginter S. Risk factors for falls among elderly persons living in the community. N Engl J Med 1988; 319: 1701–7. 14. Isaacs B. An Introduction to Geriatrics. London: Balliere, Tindall and Cassell, 1965. 15. Heinrich S, Rapp K, Rissmann U, Becker C, K{\"o}nig HH. Cost of falls in old age: a systematic review. Osteoporosis Int 2009; Epub ahead of print November 19. 16. Royal College of Physicians. Incontinence: causes, management and provision of services. Report of working party. London: RCP, 1995. 17. Scuffham P, Chaplin S, Legood R. Incidence and costs of unintentional falls in older people in the United Kingdom. J Epidemiol Commun Health 2003; 59: 740–4. 18. Brown JS, Vittinghoff E, Wyman JF, Stone KL, Nevitt MC, Ensrud KE. Urinary incontinence: does it increase risk for falls and fracture? J Am Ger Soc 2000; 48: 721–5. 19. Takazawa K, Arisawa K. Relationship between the type of urinary incontinence and falls among frail elderly women in Japan. J Med Invest 2005; 52: 165–71. 39 Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls Downloaded from http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/ at Edge Hill University College on January 17, 2012 20. McGrother C, Donaldson M, Hayward T et al. Urinary strorage symptoms and comorbidities: a prospective population cohort study in middle aged and older women. Age Ageing 2006; 35: 16–24. 21. Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983; 67: 361–70. 22. Loharuka S, Barrett JA, Roe B. Incontinence and falls in older people: is there a link? Nurs Times 2005; 101: 52–4. 23. Tinetti M, Inouye SK, Gill TM, Doucette JT. Shared risk factors for falls, incontinence and functional dependence. JAMA 1995; 273: 1348–53. 24. Mitteness L. The management of urinary incontinence by community-living elderly. Gerontologist 1987; 27: 185–93. 25. Dallosso HM, Matthews RJ, McGrother CW et al. An investigation into nonresponse bias in a postal survey on urinary symptoms. BJU Int 2003; 91: 631–6. 26. Beauchet O, Annweiler C, Allali G, Berrut G, Herrmann F, Dubost V. Recurrent falls and dual task-related decrease in walking speed: is there a relationship? J Am Ger Soc 2008; 56: 1265–9. 27. American Geriatrics Society. British Geriatrics Society and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Panel on Falls Prevention. Guideline for the prevention of falls in older persons. J Am Ger Soc 2001; 49: 664–72.",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1093/ageing/afr125",
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Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study. / Foley, Anne L; Loharuka, Shankar; Barrett, James A; Mathews, Ruth; Williams, Kate; McGrother, Catherine W; Roe, Brenda.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 41, No. 1, 24.09.2012, p. 35-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study

AU - Foley, Anne L

AU - Loharuka, Shankar

AU - Barrett, James A

AU - Mathews, Ruth

AU - Williams, Kate

AU - McGrother, Catherine W

AU - Roe, Brenda

N1 - 1. De Vicenzo D, Watkins S. Accidental falls in rehabilitations settings. Rehabil Nurs 1987; 12: 248–52. 2. Baker S, Harvey A. Fall injuries in the elderly. Clin Geriatr Med 1985; 1: 501–12. 3. Liddle J, Gilleard C. The emotional consequences of falls for patients and their families. Age Ageing 1994; 23 (Supp 4): 17. 4. Thom DH, Haan MN, Vandeneeden SK. Medically recognized urinary incontinence and risks of hospitalization, nursing home admission and mortality. Age Ageing 1997; 26: 367–74. 5. Donald IP, Bulpitt CJ. The prognosis of falls in elderly people living at home. Age Ageing 1999; 28: 121–5. 6. Sattin RW, Lambert Huber DA, DeVito CA. The incidence of fall injury events among the elderly in a defined population. Am J Epidemiol 1990; 131: 1028–37. 7. Vetter N, Ford D. Anxiety and depression scores in elderly fallers. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 1989; 4: 158–63. 8. McGrother CW, Donaldson MMK, Shaw C et al. Storage symptoms of the bladder: prevalence, incidence and need for services in the UK. BJU Int 2004; 93: 763–9. 9. Stefania M, Nadia M, Jean L, Mara P, Giuliano E, Gaetano C. Prevalence rate of urinary incontinence in community-dwelling elderly individuals. J Gerontol A: Biol Sci Med Sci 2001; 56: M14–8. 10. Hunskaar S, Ostbye T, Borrie MJ. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in elderly Canadians and its association with dementia, ambulatory function and institutionalization. Norwegian J Epidemiol 1998; 8: 177–82. 11. O’Loughlin JL, Robitaille Y, Boivin J-F, Suissa S. Incidence and risk factors for falls and injurious falls among the community- dwelling elderly. Am J Epidemiol 1993; 137: 342–54. 12. Bergland A, Wyller TB. Risk factors for serious fall related injury in elderly women living at home. Inj Prev 2004; 10: 308–13. 13. Tinetti M, Speechley M, Ginter S. Risk factors for falls among elderly persons living in the community. N Engl J Med 1988; 319: 1701–7. 14. Isaacs B. An Introduction to Geriatrics. London: Balliere, Tindall and Cassell, 1965. 15. Heinrich S, Rapp K, Rissmann U, Becker C, König HH. Cost of falls in old age: a systematic review. Osteoporosis Int 2009; Epub ahead of print November 19. 16. Royal College of Physicians. Incontinence: causes, management and provision of services. Report of working party. London: RCP, 1995. 17. Scuffham P, Chaplin S, Legood R. Incidence and costs of unintentional falls in older people in the United Kingdom. J Epidemiol Commun Health 2003; 59: 740–4. 18. Brown JS, Vittinghoff E, Wyman JF, Stone KL, Nevitt MC, Ensrud KE. Urinary incontinence: does it increase risk for falls and fracture? J Am Ger Soc 2000; 48: 721–5. 19. Takazawa K, Arisawa K. Relationship between the type of urinary incontinence and falls among frail elderly women in Japan. J Med Invest 2005; 52: 165–71. 39 Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls Downloaded from http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/ at Edge Hill University College on January 17, 2012 20. McGrother C, Donaldson M, Hayward T et al. Urinary strorage symptoms and comorbidities: a prospective population cohort study in middle aged and older women. Age Ageing 2006; 35: 16–24. 21. Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983; 67: 361–70. 22. Loharuka S, Barrett JA, Roe B. Incontinence and falls in older people: is there a link? Nurs Times 2005; 101: 52–4. 23. Tinetti M, Inouye SK, Gill TM, Doucette JT. Shared risk factors for falls, incontinence and functional dependence. JAMA 1995; 273: 1348–53. 24. Mitteness L. The management of urinary incontinence by community-living elderly. Gerontologist 1987; 27: 185–93. 25. Dallosso HM, Matthews RJ, McGrother CW et al. An investigation into nonresponse bias in a postal survey on urinary symptoms. BJU Int 2003; 91: 631–6. 26. Beauchet O, Annweiler C, Allali G, Berrut G, Herrmann F, Dubost V. Recurrent falls and dual task-related decrease in walking speed: is there a relationship? J Am Ger Soc 2008; 56: 1265–9. 27. American Geriatrics Society. British Geriatrics Society and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Panel on Falls Prevention. Guideline for the prevention of falls in older persons. J Am Ger Soc 2001; 49: 664–72.

PY - 2012/9/24

Y1 - 2012/9/24

N2 - Objective: to determine whether urinary incontinence per se and different types of urinary incontinence individually are associated with an increased risk of falls in those aged 70 years and over. To investigate whether the presence of urinary symptoms, poor quality of life and physical limitations in this population with urinary incontinence is associated with falls. Design: study using data from the cross-sectional postal questionnaire undertaken in the Leicestershire Medical Research Council Incontinence Study. Setting: Leicestershire. Participants: a total of 5,474 people aged 70 years or more living in the community randomly selected from general practitioners’ lists. Results: urinary incontinence and both urge and stress incontinence were positively related to falls (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). The larger the volume of urine lost, the greater the risk of falls (P < 0.0001). Falls were associated with the presence of urinary symptoms (P = 0.01 or less), physical limitations (P = 0.001 or less) and having a poorer quality of life (P = 0.004 or less) in respondents with urinary incontinence. Conclusions: an association has been shown between falling and urinary leakage including the previously unreported association with stress leakage. Falling and urinary incontinence were found to be associated with physical limitations and had an impact on quality of life.

AB - Objective: to determine whether urinary incontinence per se and different types of urinary incontinence individually are associated with an increased risk of falls in those aged 70 years and over. To investigate whether the presence of urinary symptoms, poor quality of life and physical limitations in this population with urinary incontinence is associated with falls. Design: study using data from the cross-sectional postal questionnaire undertaken in the Leicestershire Medical Research Council Incontinence Study. Setting: Leicestershire. Participants: a total of 5,474 people aged 70 years or more living in the community randomly selected from general practitioners’ lists. Results: urinary incontinence and both urge and stress incontinence were positively related to falls (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). The larger the volume of urine lost, the greater the risk of falls (P < 0.0001). Falls were associated with the presence of urinary symptoms (P = 0.01 or less), physical limitations (P = 0.001 or less) and having a poorer quality of life (P = 0.004 or less) in respondents with urinary incontinence. Conclusions: an association has been shown between falling and urinary leakage including the previously unreported association with stress leakage. Falling and urinary incontinence were found to be associated with physical limitations and had an impact on quality of life.

U2 - 10.1093/ageing/afr125

DO - 10.1093/ageing/afr125

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 35

EP - 40

JO - Age and Ageing

JF - Age and Ageing

SN - 0002-0729

IS - 1

ER -