Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression - Pilot Workshop Report

Shelly Haslam, Ailsa Parsons, Joanna Omylinska-Thurston, Kerry Nair, Julianne Harlow, Jennifer Lewis, Scott Thurston, Julia Griffin, Linda Dubrow-Marshall, Vicky Karkou

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Abstract

Introduction: Research over the last decade has identified both strengths and limitations in the use of routinely prescribed psychological therapies for depression. More recently, a focus on creative art therapies, and 'art on prescription' are developing a growing recognition of their potential additional therapeutic mechanisms for depression. Therefore, in an attempt to develop a new therapeutic intervention for depression, this research aligned both the evidence base surrounding the arts on prescription movement, collating these with client-reported helpful factors and preferences for therapeutic interventions. Study design: We developed a framework for a new pluralistic ‘meta-approach’ of therapy for depression, based on an interdisciplinary thematic synthesis of active ingredients, considered specific features implemented in therapy and client reported helpful factors considered to be the broad features or experiences in therapy from both talking therapies and creative approaches. This framework contributed to the development of a pilot workshop entitled; Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression. An outline of, and evaluation from, this workshop is presented in this paper. Methods: Workshop participants were recruited via a voluntary workshop taking place at a North West Higher Education Institution Arts and Health conference (N=15). Results: The workshop was evaluated using quantitative measures, with results indicating around a 70% overall satisfaction, followed up with qualitative commentary around areas of good practice and areas for development. These included the positive reflection on the application of creative arts and the multimodal nature of the approach, whilst others reflected on the potential overwhelming nature of utilising multimodal methods for individuals with depression. Conclusion: Overall feedback from the pilot workshop is discussed in relation to prior research, giving credence to the potential for incorporating arts into therapy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPerspectives in Public Health
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2 Jan 2019

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Art
Depression
Psychology
Education
Art Therapy
Therapeutics
Prescriptions
Research
Health

Keywords

  • Creative
  • arts
  • psychological therapies
  • psychotherapy
  • counselling
  • multimodal
  • pluralistic
  • depression

Cite this

Haslam, Shelly ; Parsons, Ailsa ; Omylinska-Thurston, Joanna ; Nair, Kerry ; Harlow, Julianne ; Lewis, Jennifer ; Thurston, Scott ; Griffin, Julia ; Dubrow-Marshall, Linda ; Karkou, Vicky. / Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression - Pilot Workshop Report. In: Perspectives in Public Health. 2019.
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abstract = "Introduction: Research over the last decade has identified both strengths and limitations in the use of routinely prescribed psychological therapies for depression. More recently, a focus on creative art therapies, and 'art on prescription' are developing a growing recognition of their potential additional therapeutic mechanisms for depression. Therefore, in an attempt to develop a new therapeutic intervention for depression, this research aligned both the evidence base surrounding the arts on prescription movement, collating these with client-reported helpful factors and preferences for therapeutic interventions. Study design: We developed a framework for a new pluralistic ‘meta-approach’ of therapy for depression, based on an interdisciplinary thematic synthesis of active ingredients, considered specific features implemented in therapy and client reported helpful factors considered to be the broad features or experiences in therapy from both talking therapies and creative approaches. This framework contributed to the development of a pilot workshop entitled; Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression. An outline of, and evaluation from, this workshop is presented in this paper. Methods: Workshop participants were recruited via a voluntary workshop taking place at a North West Higher Education Institution Arts and Health conference (N=15). Results: The workshop was evaluated using quantitative measures, with results indicating around a 70{\%} overall satisfaction, followed up with qualitative commentary around areas of good practice and areas for development. These included the positive reflection on the application of creative arts and the multimodal nature of the approach, whilst others reflected on the potential overwhelming nature of utilising multimodal methods for individuals with depression. Conclusion: Overall feedback from the pilot workshop is discussed in relation to prior research, giving credence to the potential for incorporating arts into therapy.",
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Haslam, S, Parsons, A, Omylinska-Thurston, J, Nair, K, Harlow, J, Lewis, J, Thurston, S, Griffin, J, Dubrow-Marshall, L & Karkou, V 2019, 'Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression - Pilot Workshop Report', Perspectives in Public Health.

Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression - Pilot Workshop Report. / Haslam, Shelly; Parsons, Ailsa; Omylinska-Thurston, Joanna; Nair, Kerry; Harlow, Julianne; Lewis, Jennifer; Thurston, Scott; Griffin, Julia; Dubrow-Marshall, Linda; Karkou, Vicky.

In: Perspectives in Public Health, 02.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression - Pilot Workshop Report

AU - Haslam, Shelly

AU - Parsons, Ailsa

AU - Omylinska-Thurston, Joanna

AU - Nair, Kerry

AU - Harlow, Julianne

AU - Lewis, Jennifer

AU - Thurston, Scott

AU - Griffin, Julia

AU - Dubrow-Marshall, Linda

AU - Karkou, Vicky

PY - 2019/1/2

Y1 - 2019/1/2

N2 - Introduction: Research over the last decade has identified both strengths and limitations in the use of routinely prescribed psychological therapies for depression. More recently, a focus on creative art therapies, and 'art on prescription' are developing a growing recognition of their potential additional therapeutic mechanisms for depression. Therefore, in an attempt to develop a new therapeutic intervention for depression, this research aligned both the evidence base surrounding the arts on prescription movement, collating these with client-reported helpful factors and preferences for therapeutic interventions. Study design: We developed a framework for a new pluralistic ‘meta-approach’ of therapy for depression, based on an interdisciplinary thematic synthesis of active ingredients, considered specific features implemented in therapy and client reported helpful factors considered to be the broad features or experiences in therapy from both talking therapies and creative approaches. This framework contributed to the development of a pilot workshop entitled; Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression. An outline of, and evaluation from, this workshop is presented in this paper. Methods: Workshop participants were recruited via a voluntary workshop taking place at a North West Higher Education Institution Arts and Health conference (N=15). Results: The workshop was evaluated using quantitative measures, with results indicating around a 70% overall satisfaction, followed up with qualitative commentary around areas of good practice and areas for development. These included the positive reflection on the application of creative arts and the multimodal nature of the approach, whilst others reflected on the potential overwhelming nature of utilising multimodal methods for individuals with depression. Conclusion: Overall feedback from the pilot workshop is discussed in relation to prior research, giving credence to the potential for incorporating arts into therapy.

AB - Introduction: Research over the last decade has identified both strengths and limitations in the use of routinely prescribed psychological therapies for depression. More recently, a focus on creative art therapies, and 'art on prescription' are developing a growing recognition of their potential additional therapeutic mechanisms for depression. Therefore, in an attempt to develop a new therapeutic intervention for depression, this research aligned both the evidence base surrounding the arts on prescription movement, collating these with client-reported helpful factors and preferences for therapeutic interventions. Study design: We developed a framework for a new pluralistic ‘meta-approach’ of therapy for depression, based on an interdisciplinary thematic synthesis of active ingredients, considered specific features implemented in therapy and client reported helpful factors considered to be the broad features or experiences in therapy from both talking therapies and creative approaches. This framework contributed to the development of a pilot workshop entitled; Arts for the Blues – A New Creative Psychological Therapy for Depression. An outline of, and evaluation from, this workshop is presented in this paper. Methods: Workshop participants were recruited via a voluntary workshop taking place at a North West Higher Education Institution Arts and Health conference (N=15). Results: The workshop was evaluated using quantitative measures, with results indicating around a 70% overall satisfaction, followed up with qualitative commentary around areas of good practice and areas for development. These included the positive reflection on the application of creative arts and the multimodal nature of the approach, whilst others reflected on the potential overwhelming nature of utilising multimodal methods for individuals with depression. Conclusion: Overall feedback from the pilot workshop is discussed in relation to prior research, giving credence to the potential for incorporating arts into therapy.

KW - Creative

KW - arts

KW - psychological therapies

KW - psychotherapy

KW - counselling

KW - multimodal

KW - pluralistic

KW - depression

M3 - Article

JO - Perspectives in Public Health

JF - Perspectives in Public Health

SN - 1757-9139

ER -