An investigation of factors affecting the outcome of the clinical skills assessment (CSA) in general practice specialty training

Ben Shaw, J Fox, Jeremy Brown, A Hart, J Mamelok

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Identifying general practice trainees at risk of failing the CSA early in their training is important so that supportive measures can be put in place to ensure training progression. The aim of this study was to determine aspects of the trainee's learning portfolio activity which might predict performance in the CSA. From the Mersey School of General Practice records, details were obtained for trainees who had completed their ST3 year between 1 August and 31 December 2012 with respect to the numbers of entries for the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX), case-based discussions (CBDs), directly observed procedures (DOPS), learning logs and personal development plans (PDPs) that they had carried out in each of their ST1 and ST2 years. Gender, university of qualification and years since qualification were also recorded. Records were obtained for 116 trainees (94 had passed their CSA). ST1 number of CBD and ST1 number of DOPS, university of qualification, gender, and shorter time since qualification were significantly associated with CSA pass. A multivariate model indicated that graduation from a European university and being female were both associated with an increased chance of passing. Longer time since qualification, non-European university graduation and male gender are the strongest predictors of failing the CSA. Portfolio activity is not a predictor of CSA outcome.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)91-95
    JournalEducation for Primary Care
    Volume25
    Issue number2
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Mar 2014

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