A UK survey on the experience and views of Respiratory Nurses (RNs) on their role in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

K Heslop-Marshall, Katherine Knighting, Melissa Pilkington, Carol Kelly

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

Background COPD is a progressive, irreversible condition. Anxiety and depression are two common, yet least treated co-morbidities, in COPD. RNs frequently encounter patients with distressing symptoms hence are ideally placed to address these. CBT delivered by RNs reduces symptoms of anxiety, depression, improves quality of life and is cost -effective [1]. A UK-wide Delphi survey conducted with RNs in 2016-17 identified that the topic of psychological interventions, including CBT, was ranked in the top five areas of care for future research [2]. Aim To explore views of RNs on the importance of screening/providing integrated psychological treatment into routine care and the feasibility of undertaking education and training in CBT. Method A UK-wide electronic survey was conducted to gather respiratory nurses views on the importance of addressing psychological well-being, current practice, feasibility of education and training in CBT from a personal and organisational perspective. The results were collated and analysed. Results Ninety-six responses were received. The majority (58%) of respondents had >10 years’ experience in respiratory care and represented a diverse spread of regions across the UK. The results are presented in table 1. Conclusions There is a clear recognition from RNs of the importance of screening respiratory patients for symptoms of anxiety/depression and undertake further education to deliver psychological treatment such as CBT. RNs with skills to address both physical and psychological symptoms of COPD may be more beneficial and acceptable to patients.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Dec 2017
EventBritish Thoracic Society Winter Meeting - Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Dec 20178 Dec 2017

Conference

ConferenceBritish Thoracic Society Winter Meeting
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period6/12/178/12/17

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Cognitive Therapy
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Nurses
Psychology
Anxiety
Depression
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Quality of Life
Morbidity
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics

Cite this

@conference{ef4f19045ba24f899f3e7b176424f04e,
title = "A UK survey on the experience and views of Respiratory Nurses (RNs) on their role in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease",
abstract = "Background COPD is a progressive, irreversible condition. Anxiety and depression are two common, yet least treated co-morbidities, in COPD. RNs frequently encounter patients with distressing symptoms hence are ideally placed to address these. CBT delivered by RNs reduces symptoms of anxiety, depression, improves quality of life and is cost -effective [1]. A UK-wide Delphi survey conducted with RNs in 2016-17 identified that the topic of psychological interventions, including CBT, was ranked in the top five areas of care for future research [2]. Aim To explore views of RNs on the importance of screening/providing integrated psychological treatment into routine care and the feasibility of undertaking education and training in CBT. Method A UK-wide electronic survey was conducted to gather respiratory nurses views on the importance of addressing psychological well-being, current practice, feasibility of education and training in CBT from a personal and organisational perspective. The results were collated and analysed. Results Ninety-six responses were received. The majority (58{\%}) of respondents had >10 years’ experience in respiratory care and represented a diverse spread of regions across the UK. The results are presented in table 1. Conclusions There is a clear recognition from RNs of the importance of screening respiratory patients for symptoms of anxiety/depression and undertake further education to deliver psychological treatment such as CBT. RNs with skills to address both physical and psychological symptoms of COPD may be more beneficial and acceptable to patients.",
author = "K Heslop-Marshall and Katherine Knighting and Melissa Pilkington and Carol Kelly",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "6",
language = "English",
note = "British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting ; Conference date: 06-12-2017 Through 08-12-2017",

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Heslop-Marshall, K, Knighting, K, Pilkington, M & Kelly, C 2017, 'A UK survey on the experience and views of Respiratory Nurses (RNs) on their role in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease' Paper presented at British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting, London, United Kingdom, 6/12/17 - 8/12/17, .

A UK survey on the experience and views of Respiratory Nurses (RNs) on their role in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. / Heslop-Marshall, K; Knighting, Katherine; Pilkington, Melissa; Kelly, Carol.

2017. Paper presented at British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting, London, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - A UK survey on the experience and views of Respiratory Nurses (RNs) on their role in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

AU - Heslop-Marshall, K

AU - Knighting, Katherine

AU - Pilkington, Melissa

AU - Kelly, Carol

PY - 2017/12/6

Y1 - 2017/12/6

N2 - Background COPD is a progressive, irreversible condition. Anxiety and depression are two common, yet least treated co-morbidities, in COPD. RNs frequently encounter patients with distressing symptoms hence are ideally placed to address these. CBT delivered by RNs reduces symptoms of anxiety, depression, improves quality of life and is cost -effective [1]. A UK-wide Delphi survey conducted with RNs in 2016-17 identified that the topic of psychological interventions, including CBT, was ranked in the top five areas of care for future research [2]. Aim To explore views of RNs on the importance of screening/providing integrated psychological treatment into routine care and the feasibility of undertaking education and training in CBT. Method A UK-wide electronic survey was conducted to gather respiratory nurses views on the importance of addressing psychological well-being, current practice, feasibility of education and training in CBT from a personal and organisational perspective. The results were collated and analysed. Results Ninety-six responses were received. The majority (58%) of respondents had >10 years’ experience in respiratory care and represented a diverse spread of regions across the UK. The results are presented in table 1. Conclusions There is a clear recognition from RNs of the importance of screening respiratory patients for symptoms of anxiety/depression and undertake further education to deliver psychological treatment such as CBT. RNs with skills to address both physical and psychological symptoms of COPD may be more beneficial and acceptable to patients.

AB - Background COPD is a progressive, irreversible condition. Anxiety and depression are two common, yet least treated co-morbidities, in COPD. RNs frequently encounter patients with distressing symptoms hence are ideally placed to address these. CBT delivered by RNs reduces symptoms of anxiety, depression, improves quality of life and is cost -effective [1]. A UK-wide Delphi survey conducted with RNs in 2016-17 identified that the topic of psychological interventions, including CBT, was ranked in the top five areas of care for future research [2]. Aim To explore views of RNs on the importance of screening/providing integrated psychological treatment into routine care and the feasibility of undertaking education and training in CBT. Method A UK-wide electronic survey was conducted to gather respiratory nurses views on the importance of addressing psychological well-being, current practice, feasibility of education and training in CBT from a personal and organisational perspective. The results were collated and analysed. Results Ninety-six responses were received. The majority (58%) of respondents had >10 years’ experience in respiratory care and represented a diverse spread of regions across the UK. The results are presented in table 1. Conclusions There is a clear recognition from RNs of the importance of screening respiratory patients for symptoms of anxiety/depression and undertake further education to deliver psychological treatment such as CBT. RNs with skills to address both physical and psychological symptoms of COPD may be more beneficial and acceptable to patients.

M3 - Paper

ER -