A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Abstract

This chapter discusses one of the key findings from a study into good practice in competitive youth swimming – how child protection and safeguarding regulations are resulting in coaches avoiding all forms of child touch in order to protect themselves from false allegations of abuse and/or poor practice. It begins by offering an overview of the development of child protection regulations in British sport, and in swimming in particular, before highlighting the impact that child safety discourses have had on adult-child settings, including sports coaching. An outline of the methods used in the study is then presented, followed by a discussion of the key themes. To conclude, the central messages for policymakers and sports organisations are presented.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationElite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives
EditorsCelia H Brackenridge, Daniel Rhind
Place of PublicationUxbridge
PublisherBrunel University Press
Pages127-137
Number of pages159
ISBN (Print)9781902316833
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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child protection
coach
Sports
regulation
coaching
best practice
abuse
discourse

Keywords

  • child protection
  • coach protection
  • swimming

Cite this

Lang, M. (2010). A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches. In C. H. Brackenridge, & D. Rhind (Eds.), Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives (pp. 127-137). Uxbridge: Brunel University Press.
Lang, Melanie. / A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches. Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives. editor / Celia H Brackenridge ; Daniel Rhind. Uxbridge : Brunel University Press, 2010. pp. 127-137
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title = "A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches",
abstract = "This chapter discusses one of the key findings from a study into good practice in competitive youth swimming – how child protection and safeguarding regulations are resulting in coaches avoiding all forms of child touch in order to protect themselves from false allegations of abuse and/or poor practice. It begins by offering an overview of the development of child protection regulations in British sport, and in swimming in particular, before highlighting the impact that child safety discourses have had on adult-child settings, including sports coaching. An outline of the methods used in the study is then presented, followed by a discussion of the key themes. To conclude, the central messages for policymakers and sports organisations are presented.",
keywords = "child protection, coach protection, swimming",
author = "Melanie Lang",
note = "Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) (2004) Wavepower: ASA child protection in swimming – Procedures and guidelines. Loughborough: ASA. Boocock, S. (2002) ‘The Child Protection in Sport Unit’, Journal of Sexual Aggression, 8(2): 99- 106. Borrie, A. (1998) ‘Coaching: Art or science?’, Insight, 1(1): 5. Brackenridge, C. H. (2001) Spoilsports: Understanding and preventing sexual exploitation in sport. London: Routledge. Bringer, J. D. (2002) Swimming coaches’ perceptions and the development of role conflict and role ambiguity. Unpublished doctoral thesis, Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education. Butler-Sloss, Lord Justice E. (1988) Report of the Inquiry into Child Abuse in Cleveland 1987 (Report Number 412). London: HMSO. Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU) (2003) Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport. Leicester: NSPCC. Cote, J., Salmela, J. H., Trudel, P., Baria, A. and Russell, S. (1995) ‘The coaching model: A grounded assessment of expert gymnastic coaches’ knowledge’, Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 17(1): 1-17. David, P. (2005) Human Rights in Youth Sport: A critical review of children’s rights in competitive sports. New York: Routledge. Department of Health/Welsh Office (2000) Lost in Care: The report of the tribunal of inquiry into the abuse of children in care in the former county council areas of Gwynedd and Clwyd since 1974 (The Waterhouse Report). London: HMSO. Farmer, E. and Boushel, M. (1999) ‘Child protection policy and practice: Women in the front line’, in: S. Watson and L. Doyle (Eds.) Engendering Social Policy. Buckingham: Open University Press. Fasting, K., Brackenridge, C. H. and Sundgot-Borgen, J. (2004) ‘Prevalence of sexual harassment among Norwegian female elite athletes in relation to sport type’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 39: 373-386. Freeman, M. (2000) ‘Feminism and child law’, in: J. Bridgeman and D. Monk (Eds.) Feminist Perspectives on Child Law. London: Cavendish. Furedi, F. (2001) Paranoid Parenting: Abandon your anxieties and be a good parent. London: Penguin. Furedi, F. and Bristow, J. (2008) Licensed to Hug: How child protection policies are poisoning the relationship between the generations and damaging the voluntary sector. London: Civitas. Gervis, M. and Dunn, N. (2004) ‘The emotional abuse of elite child athletes by their coaches. Child Abuse Review’, 13: 215-223. Glaser, B. and Strauss, A. (1967) The Discovery of Grounded Theory: A strategy for qualitative research. Chicago: Aldine. Hassall, C., Johnston, L. H., Bringer, J. D. and Brackenridge, C. H. (2002) ‘Attitudes towards sexual harassment: Coach and athlete perceptions of ambiguous behaviours’, Journal of Sport Pedagogy, 8(2): 1-21. Hudson, A. (1992) ‘The child sexual abuse ‘industry’ and gender relations in social work’, in: M. Langan and L. Day (Eds.) Women, Oppression and Social Work: Issues in anti-discriminatory practice. London: Routledge. Jones, A. (2004) ‘Social anxiety, sex, surveillance and the ‘safe’ teacher’, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 25(1): 53-66. Jones, P. (2009) Rethinking childhood: Attitudes in contemporary society. London: Continuum International. Jones, R. L., Armour, K. M. and Potrac, P. (2003) ‘Constructing expert knowledge: A case study of a top-level professional soccer coach’, Sport, Education and Society, 8(2): 213-229. Jones, R. L., Glintmeyer, N. and McKenzie, A. (2005) ‘Slim bodies, eating disorders and the coach-athlete relationship: A tale of identity creation and disruption’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 40(3): 377-391. Jowett, S. (2007) ‘Interdependence analysis and the 3 + 1Cs in the coach-athlete relationship’, in: S. Jowett and D. Lavallee (Eds.) Social Psychology in Sport. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. Kerr, G. A. and Stirling, A. E. (2008) ‘Child protection in sport: Implications of an athlete-centred philosophy’, Quest, 60: 307-323. Kirby, S., Greaves, L. and Hankivsky, O. (2000) Dome of Silence: Sexual harassment and abuse in sport. London: Zed Books. MacPhail, A. (2004) ‘Athlete and researcher: Undertaking and pursuing an ethnographic study in a sports club’, Qualitative Research, 4(2): 227-245. Martens, R. (1996) Successful Coaching. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. McWilliam, E. (2001) ‘Pleasures proper and improper: A genealogy of teacher/student intimacy’, in: A. Jones (Ed) Touchy Subject: Teachers touching children. Dunedin: Otago University Press. McWilliam, E. (2003) ‘The vulnerable child as a pedagogical subject’, Journal of Curriculum Theorising, 19(2): 35-45. McWilliam, E. and Jones, A. (2005) ‘An unprotected species? On teachers as risky subjects’, British Educational Research Journal, 31(1): 109-120. Piper, H. and Smith, H. (2003) ‘Touch in educational and child care settings: Dilemmas and responses’, British Educational Research Journal, 29(6): 879-794. Piper, H., Powell, J. and Smith, H. (2006) ‘Parents, professionals and paranoia: The touching of children in a culture of fear’, Journal of Social Work, 6(2): 151-167. Poczwardowski, A., Barott, J. R. and Peregoy, J. J. (2002) ‘The athlete and coach: Their relationships and its meaning – Methodological concerns and research process’, International Journal of Sport Psychology, 33: 98–115. Stirling, A. E. (2007) Elite female athletes’ experiences of emotional abuse in the coach-athlete relationship. Unpublished masters thesis, University of Toronto, Canada. Turner, M., and McCrory, P. (2004) ‘Child protection in sport’, British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38: 106-107. Wallace, J. (1995) ‘Technologies of ‘the child’: Towards a theory of the child-subject’, Textual Practice, 9(2): 285–302.",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781902316833",
pages = "127--137",
editor = "Brackenridge, {Celia H} and Daniel Rhind",
booktitle = "Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives",
publisher = "Brunel University Press",

}

Lang, M 2010, A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches. in CH Brackenridge & D Rhind (eds), Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives. Brunel University Press, Uxbridge, pp. 127-137.

A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches. / Lang, Melanie.

Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives. ed. / Celia H Brackenridge; Daniel Rhind. Uxbridge : Brunel University Press, 2010. p. 127-137.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches

AU - Lang, Melanie

N1 - Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) (2004) Wavepower: ASA child protection in swimming – Procedures and guidelines. Loughborough: ASA. Boocock, S. (2002) ‘The Child Protection in Sport Unit’, Journal of Sexual Aggression, 8(2): 99- 106. Borrie, A. (1998) ‘Coaching: Art or science?’, Insight, 1(1): 5. Brackenridge, C. H. (2001) Spoilsports: Understanding and preventing sexual exploitation in sport. London: Routledge. Bringer, J. D. (2002) Swimming coaches’ perceptions and the development of role conflict and role ambiguity. Unpublished doctoral thesis, Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education. Butler-Sloss, Lord Justice E. (1988) Report of the Inquiry into Child Abuse in Cleveland 1987 (Report Number 412). London: HMSO. Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU) (2003) Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport. Leicester: NSPCC. Cote, J., Salmela, J. H., Trudel, P., Baria, A. and Russell, S. (1995) ‘The coaching model: A grounded assessment of expert gymnastic coaches’ knowledge’, Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 17(1): 1-17. David, P. (2005) Human Rights in Youth Sport: A critical review of children’s rights in competitive sports. New York: Routledge. Department of Health/Welsh Office (2000) Lost in Care: The report of the tribunal of inquiry into the abuse of children in care in the former county council areas of Gwynedd and Clwyd since 1974 (The Waterhouse Report). London: HMSO. Farmer, E. and Boushel, M. (1999) ‘Child protection policy and practice: Women in the front line’, in: S. Watson and L. Doyle (Eds.) Engendering Social Policy. Buckingham: Open University Press. Fasting, K., Brackenridge, C. H. and Sundgot-Borgen, J. (2004) ‘Prevalence of sexual harassment among Norwegian female elite athletes in relation to sport type’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 39: 373-386. Freeman, M. (2000) ‘Feminism and child law’, in: J. Bridgeman and D. Monk (Eds.) Feminist Perspectives on Child Law. London: Cavendish. Furedi, F. (2001) Paranoid Parenting: Abandon your anxieties and be a good parent. London: Penguin. Furedi, F. and Bristow, J. (2008) Licensed to Hug: How child protection policies are poisoning the relationship between the generations and damaging the voluntary sector. London: Civitas. Gervis, M. and Dunn, N. (2004) ‘The emotional abuse of elite child athletes by their coaches. Child Abuse Review’, 13: 215-223. Glaser, B. and Strauss, A. (1967) The Discovery of Grounded Theory: A strategy for qualitative research. Chicago: Aldine. Hassall, C., Johnston, L. H., Bringer, J. D. and Brackenridge, C. H. (2002) ‘Attitudes towards sexual harassment: Coach and athlete perceptions of ambiguous behaviours’, Journal of Sport Pedagogy, 8(2): 1-21. Hudson, A. (1992) ‘The child sexual abuse ‘industry’ and gender relations in social work’, in: M. Langan and L. Day (Eds.) Women, Oppression and Social Work: Issues in anti-discriminatory practice. London: Routledge. Jones, A. (2004) ‘Social anxiety, sex, surveillance and the ‘safe’ teacher’, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 25(1): 53-66. Jones, P. (2009) Rethinking childhood: Attitudes in contemporary society. London: Continuum International. Jones, R. L., Armour, K. M. and Potrac, P. (2003) ‘Constructing expert knowledge: A case study of a top-level professional soccer coach’, Sport, Education and Society, 8(2): 213-229. Jones, R. L., Glintmeyer, N. and McKenzie, A. (2005) ‘Slim bodies, eating disorders and the coach-athlete relationship: A tale of identity creation and disruption’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 40(3): 377-391. Jowett, S. (2007) ‘Interdependence analysis and the 3 + 1Cs in the coach-athlete relationship’, in: S. Jowett and D. Lavallee (Eds.) Social Psychology in Sport. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. Kerr, G. A. and Stirling, A. E. (2008) ‘Child protection in sport: Implications of an athlete-centred philosophy’, Quest, 60: 307-323. Kirby, S., Greaves, L. and Hankivsky, O. (2000) Dome of Silence: Sexual harassment and abuse in sport. London: Zed Books. MacPhail, A. (2004) ‘Athlete and researcher: Undertaking and pursuing an ethnographic study in a sports club’, Qualitative Research, 4(2): 227-245. Martens, R. (1996) Successful Coaching. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. McWilliam, E. (2001) ‘Pleasures proper and improper: A genealogy of teacher/student intimacy’, in: A. Jones (Ed) Touchy Subject: Teachers touching children. Dunedin: Otago University Press. McWilliam, E. (2003) ‘The vulnerable child as a pedagogical subject’, Journal of Curriculum Theorising, 19(2): 35-45. McWilliam, E. and Jones, A. (2005) ‘An unprotected species? On teachers as risky subjects’, British Educational Research Journal, 31(1): 109-120. Piper, H. and Smith, H. (2003) ‘Touch in educational and child care settings: Dilemmas and responses’, British Educational Research Journal, 29(6): 879-794. Piper, H., Powell, J. and Smith, H. (2006) ‘Parents, professionals and paranoia: The touching of children in a culture of fear’, Journal of Social Work, 6(2): 151-167. Poczwardowski, A., Barott, J. R. and Peregoy, J. J. (2002) ‘The athlete and coach: Their relationships and its meaning – Methodological concerns and research process’, International Journal of Sport Psychology, 33: 98–115. Stirling, A. E. (2007) Elite female athletes’ experiences of emotional abuse in the coach-athlete relationship. Unpublished masters thesis, University of Toronto, Canada. Turner, M., and McCrory, P. (2004) ‘Child protection in sport’, British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38: 106-107. Wallace, J. (1995) ‘Technologies of ‘the child’: Towards a theory of the child-subject’, Textual Practice, 9(2): 285–302.

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Lang M. A touchy subject? The (unintended) consequences of child protection regulations on youth swimming coaches. In Brackenridge CH, Rhind D, editors, Elite Child Athlete Welfare: International Perspectives. Uxbridge: Brunel University Press. 2010. p. 127-137