A survey of the health needs of hospital staff: implications for health care managers

A. Jinks, V. Lawson, R. Daniels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Developing strategies to address the health needs of the National Health Services (NHS) workforce are of concern to many health care managers. Focal to the development of such strategies are of being in receipt of baseline information about employees expressed health needs and concerns. This article addresses obtaining such baseline information and presents the findings of a health needs survey of acute hospital staff in a trust in North Wales. The total population of trust employees were surveyed (n = 2300) and a 44% (n = 1021) response rate was achieved. A number of positive findings are given. Included are that the majority of those surveyed stated that their current health status is good, are motivated to improve their health further, do not smoke and their alcohol consumption is within recommended levels. There appears, however, to be a number of areas where trust managers can help its staff improve their health. Included are trust initiatives that focus on weight control and taking more exercise. In addition, there appears to be a reported lack of knowledge and positive health behaviour amongst the male respondents surveyed that would imply the trust needs to be more effective in promoting well man type issues. Finally there appears to be a general lack of pride in working for the trust and a pervasive feeling that the trust does not care about its employees that needs to be addressed. It is concluded that the findings of this survey have implications for management practices in the trust where the survey was conducted and also wider applicability to the management of health care professionals. For example, addressing work-related psychological and physical problems of employees are of importance to all health care managers. This is especially so when considering recruitment and retention issues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-350
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume11
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2003

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Health Surveys
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Health Manpower
Practice Management
Wales
Health Behavior
National Health Programs
Occupational Health
Smoke
Alcohol Drinking
Health Status
Emotions
Exercise
Psychology
Weights and Measures
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Jinks, A. ; Lawson, V. ; Daniels, R. / A survey of the health needs of hospital staff: implications for health care managers. In: Journal of Nursing Management. 2003 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 343-350.
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A survey of the health needs of hospital staff: implications for health care managers. / Jinks, A.; Lawson, V.; Daniels, R.

In: Journal of Nursing Management, Vol. 11, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 343-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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