A survey examining the use of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation on adult intensive care units across the UK

Ema Swingwood*, Lyvonne Tume, Fiona Cramp

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Despite potential benefits, it is not known how widely physiotherapists use mechanical insufflation-exsufflation devices on UK adult intensive care units. This survey aimed to describe mechanical insufflation-exsufflation use in UK adult intensive care units. Methods: Cross-sectional electronic survey of physiotherapists working in a permanent post on adult intensive care units. Results: One hundred and sixty-six complete surveys were available for analysis, reflecting a diverse geographical spread. Nearly all (98%; 163/166) clinicians had access to mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. The estimated frequency of use varied, with the majority reporting weekly or monthly use (52/163, 32%; 50/163, 31%, respectively). Nearly all clinicians (99%) used mechanical insufflation-exsufflation with extubated patients. In contrast, around half of respondents (86/163, 53%) used mechanical insufflation-exsufflation with intubated patients, with a range of perceived barriers reported. Conclusions: Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation devices are widely available on UK adult intensive care units, with use more common in extubated patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-289
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Intensive Care Society
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Cough assist
  • cough augmentation
  • mechanical ventilation
  • physiotherapy
  • weaning

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