A study of adjustment among first generation entrants to higher education

L. Sumner, R. Ralley, S. Pressler, P. Hornby-Atkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the impact of a range of psychosocial factors on the subjective experience of new entrants to Higher Education. Design: A longitudinal study which combines convergent qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Methods: A cohort of first generation H.E. students completed health related measures, including, measures of coping, subjective well-being, self-efficacy, self-esteem and social support. Students also wrote narrative accounts in order to capture the broader experiences related to entry to Higher Education more fully. Analysis: Scores on the range of structured measures were calculated and examined in relation to social background and themes emerging from the students’ individual narrative accounts. Conclusion: In the cohort explored, particular profiles of coping strategies including clusters of negative and positive coping strategies emerged. In addition there are contrasts between the experience of this group and students who have familial experience of Higher Education. These are discussed in conjunction with themes identified in the discourse. Psychology reveals potential vulnerabilities in the widening of participation in Higher Education and we discuss how good practice can be informed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150
JournalProceedings of the British Psychological Society
Volume12
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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first generation
coping
education
experience
student
narrative
social background
psychosocial factors
self-esteem
best practice
self-efficacy
social support
longitudinal study
vulnerability
psychology
well-being
participation
discourse
methodology
health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objectives: To explore the impact of a range of psychosocial factors on the subjective experience of new entrants to Higher Education. Design: A longitudinal study which combines convergent qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Methods: A cohort of first generation H.E. students completed health related measures, including, measures of coping, subjective well-being, self-efficacy, self-esteem and social support. Students also wrote narrative accounts in order to capture the broader experiences related to entry to Higher Education more fully. Analysis: Scores on the range of structured measures were calculated and examined in relation to social background and themes emerging from the students’ individual narrative accounts. Conclusion: In the cohort explored, particular profiles of coping strategies including clusters of negative and positive coping strategies emerged. In addition there are contrasts between the experience of this group and students who have familial experience of Higher Education. These are discussed in conjunction with themes identified in the discourse. Psychology reveals potential vulnerabilities in the widening of participation in Higher Education and we discuss how good practice can be informed.",
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A study of adjustment among first generation entrants to higher education. / Sumner, L.; Ralley, R.; Pressler, S.; Hornby-Atkinson, P.

In: Proceedings of the British Psychological Society, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2004, p. 150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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