A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway

S. Stirzaker, M. Gambles, B. Jack, J. Ellershaw

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background: The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a multi-professional document that provides an evidence-based framework for the delivery of care during the dying phase. Originally developed to transfer best practice from specialist palliative care into the acute sector, the document was then introduced into the Marie Curie Hospice, Liverpool in 1997. A focus group study amongst nursing staff recently undertaken in the acute sector identified the usefulness of the LCP in the delivery of care in the dying phase. However, no work has yet been undertaken around the perspectives of hospice staff. Aim: To explore doctors’ and nurses’ perceptions of using the LCP within the hospice setting. Methods: A purposive sample of ten nurses and five doctors who had worked at the hospice for at least six months were selected. This was designed to represent staff working at various grades within the organisation. Individual interviews (audio-taped and transcribed) lasting between 30 minutes and one hour were undertaken. A semi-structured topic guide was used to enable the identification of salient themes. Results: A total of 13 interviews of nine nurses and four doctors were undertaken. The LCP was generally regarded by both groups as a useful and important document for the delivery of consistent and appropriate care to dying patients and their carers. Its usefulness as a teaching tool for new/inexperienced staff was also highlighted. Perceptions of hospice staff and staff from the acute sector differed in subtle ways. Conclusion: The pathway was generally regarded favourably by both doctors and nurses in this sample.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventMarie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Dec 2004 → …

Conference

ConferenceMarie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period25/12/04 → …

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Hospices
Nurses
Interviews
Focus Groups
Palliative Care
Practice Guidelines
Caregivers

Cite this

Stirzaker, S., Gambles, M., Jack, B., & Ellershaw, J. (2004). A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway. Paper presented at Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit, London, United Kingdom.
Stirzaker, S. ; Gambles, M. ; Jack, B. ; Ellershaw, J. / A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway. Paper presented at Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit, London, United Kingdom.
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Stirzaker, S, Gambles, M, Jack, B & Ellershaw, J 2004, 'A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway' Paper presented at Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit, London, United Kingdom, 25/12/04, .

A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway. / Stirzaker, S.; Gambles, M.; Jack, B.; Ellershaw, J.

2004. Paper presented at Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit, London, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T1 - A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway

AU - Stirzaker, S.

AU - Gambles, M.

AU - Jack, B.

AU - Ellershaw, J.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Background: The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a multi-professional document that provides an evidence-based framework for the delivery of care during the dying phase. Originally developed to transfer best practice from specialist palliative care into the acute sector, the document was then introduced into the Marie Curie Hospice, Liverpool in 1997. A focus group study amongst nursing staff recently undertaken in the acute sector identified the usefulness of the LCP in the delivery of care in the dying phase. However, no work has yet been undertaken around the perspectives of hospice staff. Aim: To explore doctors’ and nurses’ perceptions of using the LCP within the hospice setting. Methods: A purposive sample of ten nurses and five doctors who had worked at the hospice for at least six months were selected. This was designed to represent staff working at various grades within the organisation. Individual interviews (audio-taped and transcribed) lasting between 30 minutes and one hour were undertaken. A semi-structured topic guide was used to enable the identification of salient themes. Results: A total of 13 interviews of nine nurses and four doctors were undertaken. The LCP was generally regarded by both groups as a useful and important document for the delivery of consistent and appropriate care to dying patients and their carers. Its usefulness as a teaching tool for new/inexperienced staff was also highlighted. Perceptions of hospice staff and staff from the acute sector differed in subtle ways. Conclusion: The pathway was generally regarded favourably by both doctors and nurses in this sample.

AB - Background: The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a multi-professional document that provides an evidence-based framework for the delivery of care during the dying phase. Originally developed to transfer best practice from specialist palliative care into the acute sector, the document was then introduced into the Marie Curie Hospice, Liverpool in 1997. A focus group study amongst nursing staff recently undertaken in the acute sector identified the usefulness of the LCP in the delivery of care in the dying phase. However, no work has yet been undertaken around the perspectives of hospice staff. Aim: To explore doctors’ and nurses’ perceptions of using the LCP within the hospice setting. Methods: A purposive sample of ten nurses and five doctors who had worked at the hospice for at least six months were selected. This was designed to represent staff working at various grades within the organisation. Individual interviews (audio-taped and transcribed) lasting between 30 minutes and one hour were undertaken. A semi-structured topic guide was used to enable the identification of salient themes. Results: A total of 13 interviews of nine nurses and four doctors were undertaken. The LCP was generally regarded by both groups as a useful and important document for the delivery of consistent and appropriate care to dying patients and their carers. Its usefulness as a teaching tool for new/inexperienced staff was also highlighted. Perceptions of hospice staff and staff from the acute sector differed in subtle ways. Conclusion: The pathway was generally regarded favourably by both doctors and nurses in this sample.

M3 - Paper

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Stirzaker S, Gambles M, Jack B, Ellershaw J. A stakeholder evaluation of Hospice staff views of the Liverpool Care Pathway. 2004. Paper presented at Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Development Unit, London, United Kingdom.