A Novel Ingestion Strategy for Sodium Bicarbonate Supplementation in a Delayed-Release Form: a Randomised Crossover Study in Trained Males

Nathan Philip Hilton*, Nicholas Keith Leach, S. Andy Sparks, Lewis Anthony Gough, Melissa May Craig, Sanjoy Kumar Deb, Lars Robert McNaughton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)
138 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a well-established nutritional ergogenic aid, though gastrointestinal (GI) distress is a common side-effect. Delayed-release NaHCO3 may alleviate GI symptoms and enhance bicarbonate bioavailability following oral ingestion, although this has yet to be confirmed. Methods: In a randomised crossover design, pharmacokinetic responses and acid-base status were compared following two forms of NaHCO3, as were GI symptoms. Twelve trained healthy males (mean ± SD age 25.8 ± 4.5 years, maximal oxygen uptake (V ̇ O 2 max) 58.9 ± 10.9 mL kg min−1, height 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass 82.3 ± 11.1 kg, fat-free mass 72.3 ± 10.0 kg) underwent a control (CON) condition and two experimental conditions: 300 mg kg−1 body mass NaHCO3 ingested as an aqueous solution (SOL) and encased in delayed-release capsules (CAP). Blood bicarbonate concentration, pH and base excess (BE) were measured in all conditions over 180 min, as were subjective GI symptom scores. Results: Incidences of GI symptoms and overall severity were significantly lower (mean difference = 45.1%, P < 0.0005 and 47.5%, P < 0.0005 for incidences and severity, respectively) with the CAP than with the SOL. Symptoms displayed increases at 40 to 80 min post-ingestion with the SOL that were negated with CAP (P < 0.05). Time to reach peak bicarbonate concentration, pH and BE were significantly longer with CAP than with the SOL. Conclusions: In summary, CAP can mitigate GI symptoms induced with SOL and should be ingested earlier to induce similar acid-base changes. Furthermore, CAP may be more ergogenic in those who experience severe GI distress with SOL, although this warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4
Pages (from-to)1-8
JournalSports Medicine Open
Volume5
Issue number1
Early online date24 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Acid-base balance
  • Bioavailability
  • Exercise-induced fatigue
  • Extracellular buffer

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