A Late-glacial chironomid record from Hawes Water, northwest England

A. Bedford, R. Jones, B. Lang, S. Brooks, J. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This paper presents the results of a high-resolution Late-glacial chironomid stratigraphy from Hawes Water, a small carbonate lake in northern Lancashire. The samples were from a core taken from the terrestrialised margin of the present lake, which represents an intermediate depth between the true littoral and the profundal. The chironomid assemblage showed a high degree of sensitivity to both broad-scale and short-term temperature changes. Comparison with an existing proxy temperature record (δ18O) for the site confirmed the presence of four temperature inversions within the Late-glacial Interstadial. A mean July air temperature inference model, derived from acid, soft-water lakes in Norway and Svalbard, was applied to the data. Despite the absence of carbonate lakes within the Norwegian training set, there was a close similarity between trends in estimated July air temperature and the δ18O trace, with a particularly strong correspondence in the periods of clay deposition. This suggests that this model is highly robust. The inferred maximum Interstadial temperature was 13.4°C, dropping initially to 7.5°C in the Loch Lomond Stadial. Temperatures reach a maximum of nearly 10°C in this period, cool for a short period before rising rapidly to 13.2°C at the start of the Holocene. These temperatures are similar to but slightly higher than those estimated for Whitrig Bog, southeast Scotland, and lower than those inferred from coleopteran-based models for sites in South Wales.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-290
JournalJournal of Quaternary Science
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2004

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late glacial
interstadial
temperature
lake
water
air temperature
Loch Lomond Stadial
carbonate
temperature inversion
bog
lake water
stratigraphy
England
Temperature
Water
Late Glacial
Holocene
clay
acid

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Bedford, A., Jones, R., Lang, B., Brooks, S., & Marshall, J. (2004). A Late-glacial chironomid record from Hawes Water, northwest England. Journal of Quaternary Science, 19(3), 281-290. https://doi.org/10.1002/jqs.836
Bedford, A. ; Jones, R. ; Lang, B. ; Brooks, S. ; Marshall, J. / A Late-glacial chironomid record from Hawes Water, northwest England. In: Journal of Quaternary Science. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 281-290.
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Bedford, A, Jones, R, Lang, B, Brooks, S & Marshall, J 2004, 'A Late-glacial chironomid record from Hawes Water, northwest England', Journal of Quaternary Science, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 281-290. https://doi.org/10.1002/jqs.836

A Late-glacial chironomid record from Hawes Water, northwest England. / Bedford, A.; Jones, R.; Lang, B.; Brooks, S.; Marshall, J.

In: Journal of Quaternary Science, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.04.2004, p. 281-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - This paper presents the results of a high-resolution Late-glacial chironomid stratigraphy from Hawes Water, a small carbonate lake in northern Lancashire. The samples were from a core taken from the terrestrialised margin of the present lake, which represents an intermediate depth between the true littoral and the profundal. The chironomid assemblage showed a high degree of sensitivity to both broad-scale and short-term temperature changes. Comparison with an existing proxy temperature record (δ18O) for the site confirmed the presence of four temperature inversions within the Late-glacial Interstadial. A mean July air temperature inference model, derived from acid, soft-water lakes in Norway and Svalbard, was applied to the data. Despite the absence of carbonate lakes within the Norwegian training set, there was a close similarity between trends in estimated July air temperature and the δ18O trace, with a particularly strong correspondence in the periods of clay deposition. This suggests that this model is highly robust. The inferred maximum Interstadial temperature was 13.4°C, dropping initially to 7.5°C in the Loch Lomond Stadial. Temperatures reach a maximum of nearly 10°C in this period, cool for a short period before rising rapidly to 13.2°C at the start of the Holocene. These temperatures are similar to but slightly higher than those estimated for Whitrig Bog, southeast Scotland, and lower than those inferred from coleopteran-based models for sites in South Wales.

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