A further investigation of the cognitive interference hypothesis of gaze patterns during conversation

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Abstract

This study attempts to directly test the hypothesis that continuous gaze at the face of another person interferes with the production of spontaneous speech. In a quasi-interview situation subjects answered either verbal or spatial questions and either had to look continuously at the face of the interviewer or were permitted free eye movements. Measures were taken of response latency, fluency of verbal response, and in addition a number of measures of filled hesitation were made. Continuous gaze at the face of the interviewer had no significant effect on the speed or fluency of response but filled hesitations, and especially false starts, increased significantly. An interpretation in terms of the mediating effects of arousal is provided.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-248
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1981

Keywords

  • Psychology

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