A critical appraisal of the relationship between speech and gesture and its implications for the treatment of aphasia

Geoffrey Beattie, Heather Shovelton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper by Rose is an important and timely attempt to outline the implications of research on gesture and speech for the treatment of aphasia. But this is not an easy task given that major theoretical disagreements exist within the field; fundamental disagreements as to whether iconic gestures function primarily for the speaker or for the listener. It is also not made easy by the apparently contradictory research findings that many of the core empirical studies have produced. The current paper argues that Rose needs to take a much more critical perspective on some of the core studies in this area, including research on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, which is one important area of disagreement with regard to the lexical retrieval hypothesis of iconic gesture and research on the possible communicational effects of iconic gesture. This paper argues that much of the research, when critically reviewed, points towards the communicational theory of gesture and away from the lexical retrieval hypothesis and ...
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-139
Number of pages6
JournalAdvances in Speech Language Pathology
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2006

Fingerprint

Gestures
Aphasia
Research
Tongue
Gesture
Iconic

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Gesture and communication
  • Iconic gesture
  • Lexical retrieval hypothesis

Cite this

@article{93f1626c9084477285b8c20e7d13acf0,
title = "A critical appraisal of the relationship between speech and gesture and its implications for the treatment of aphasia",
abstract = "The paper by Rose is an important and timely attempt to outline the implications of research on gesture and speech for the treatment of aphasia. But this is not an easy task given that major theoretical disagreements exist within the field; fundamental disagreements as to whether iconic gestures function primarily for the speaker or for the listener. It is also not made easy by the apparently contradictory research findings that many of the core empirical studies have produced. The current paper argues that Rose needs to take a much more critical perspective on some of the core studies in this area, including research on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, which is one important area of disagreement with regard to the lexical retrieval hypothesis of iconic gesture and research on the possible communicational effects of iconic gesture. This paper argues that much of the research, when critically reviewed, points towards the communicational theory of gesture and away from the lexical retrieval hypothesis and ...",
keywords = "Aphasia, Gesture and communication, Iconic gesture, Lexical retrieval hypothesis",
author = "Geoffrey Beattie and Heather Shovelton",
year = "2006",
month = "6",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1080/14417040600667392",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "134--139",
journal = "International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology",
issn = "1754-9507",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

A critical appraisal of the relationship between speech and gesture and its implications for the treatment of aphasia. / Beattie, Geoffrey; Shovelton, Heather.

In: Advances in Speech Language Pathology, Vol. 8, No. 2, 30.06.2006, p. 134-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A critical appraisal of the relationship between speech and gesture and its implications for the treatment of aphasia

AU - Beattie, Geoffrey

AU - Shovelton, Heather

PY - 2006/6/30

Y1 - 2006/6/30

N2 - The paper by Rose is an important and timely attempt to outline the implications of research on gesture and speech for the treatment of aphasia. But this is not an easy task given that major theoretical disagreements exist within the field; fundamental disagreements as to whether iconic gestures function primarily for the speaker or for the listener. It is also not made easy by the apparently contradictory research findings that many of the core empirical studies have produced. The current paper argues that Rose needs to take a much more critical perspective on some of the core studies in this area, including research on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, which is one important area of disagreement with regard to the lexical retrieval hypothesis of iconic gesture and research on the possible communicational effects of iconic gesture. This paper argues that much of the research, when critically reviewed, points towards the communicational theory of gesture and away from the lexical retrieval hypothesis and ...

AB - The paper by Rose is an important and timely attempt to outline the implications of research on gesture and speech for the treatment of aphasia. But this is not an easy task given that major theoretical disagreements exist within the field; fundamental disagreements as to whether iconic gestures function primarily for the speaker or for the listener. It is also not made easy by the apparently contradictory research findings that many of the core empirical studies have produced. The current paper argues that Rose needs to take a much more critical perspective on some of the core studies in this area, including research on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, which is one important area of disagreement with regard to the lexical retrieval hypothesis of iconic gesture and research on the possible communicational effects of iconic gesture. This paper argues that much of the research, when critically reviewed, points towards the communicational theory of gesture and away from the lexical retrieval hypothesis and ...

KW - Aphasia

KW - Gesture and communication

KW - Iconic gesture

KW - Lexical retrieval hypothesis

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/critical-appraisal-relationship-between-speech-gesture-implications-treatment-aphasia

U2 - 10.1080/14417040600667392

DO - 10.1080/14417040600667392

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 134

EP - 139

JO - International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

JF - International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

SN - 1754-9507

IS - 2

ER -